Happy New Year – belated!

Hello and Happy New Year – only a couple days late. One of my resolutions is to do more blog posts in 2017!

In the meantime, although there have been some additions to flock and fowl, for now a simple greeting from most of the flock and some of the fowl. Wishes to all for a healthy, happy and productive new year!

 

Most of the flock managed to get into this photo - we are at 21 sheep now.

Most of the flock managed to get into this photo – we are at 21 sheep now.

Their guardians - who always come in last

Their guardians – who always come in last

The chickens who were babies in the last post. Not quite free-ranging yet.

The chickens who were babies in the last post. Not quite free-ranging yet.

And the guinea fowl. The 6 babies have joined the four older ones to free-range, although they seem to be hanging around for now!

And the guinea fowl. The 6 babies have joined the four older ones to free-range, although they seem to be hanging around for now!

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Published in: on January 3, 2017 at 11:37 pm  Comments (4)  

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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. [J&D] We wish for you that 2017 brings health happiness and that all that you do and care about shall prosper. Your sheep, llamas and poultry are certainly doing well! One thing we’ve found with blogging: it’s easier to write about daily steps, and let them be brush-strokes that make a bigger picture, rather than try and tell the whole story in one post. A little, often – and you’re more likely to keep it going. Blessings to you and the ‘assistant livestock keeper’ L !

    • Thanks for the supportive comments. I try to stay short but keep thinking of long stories! A goal for 2017 is to be more frequent and perhaps less wordy! I love your idea of “brush strokes” and will keep it in mind.

  2. [D] Just to add to our comment as biggardenblog, that the variety of sheep must be a delight – so many subtle and not-so-subtle differences in colour, feel, length.

    • It is my compensation for not having a breeding flock. Early on I decided that breeding was not for me so I enjoy the lambs that my friends’ flocks produce – even in Scotland! By not needing a ram for each breed, I am able to work with the wool of a variety of breeds. I do also work with cross bred wool as I have friends who do some intentional crossing so that is interesting, too.


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