The Other End

I posted recently about our flock’s tails. I realized when Diamond was getting in my face about needing her morning slice of bread that I had neglected the other end – our flock’s horns. Diamond is just turning 14 and her horns have seen a lot of years. She isn’t an aggressive sheep but I have seen her push others aside with them. But I think it is age rather than use that has dulled and broken hers. To us, because of her spirit, they are just as beautiful!

diamond

Jacob Sheep can have 2, 4 or even more horns. Diamond is a 4 horn. Nellie is a good example of a 2 horn. See how nice and rounded hers are? They still hurt if she accidentally runs into you. She is a little pushy about wanting through gates and doorways so it has happened.

nellie

However, it is when the horns end up sharp and pointy like Winnie’s that you really have to be careful, especially when leaning over her to give shots!

winnie

And the one you really don’t want to get in front of is Lily, whose horns decided to go forward. Lucky for her, her wool is very nice as she is a lilac Jacob so we put up with a lot!

lily

In some sheep, ewes have no horns and rams do, as with our Shetlands. The ewes Carmen and Eve are hornless (although not afraid to use their heads to butt other sheep anyway when they want to!)

carmen

"Who needs horns? I have a very cute face!"

“Who needs horns? I have a very cute face!”

Earl, our Shetland wether, has beautiful, curled horns.

earl

Some of our sheep breeds have no horns. An example would be our East Friesians, represented her by Dolly.

dolly

And sometimes a breed can have some with horns and some without. In our Navajo Churros, Ingrid does not have horns but Beatrix does – and hers are very lovely!

ingrid

beatirx

And, finally, our Karakul ewes are hornless but have little scurs – like a horn bud which you can just barely see on Kate.

kate

But Quentin, our Karakul wether, has really beautiful horns that frame his face, giving him a very Pan-like (the Greek god of shepherds and flocks, by the way!)  look, I think.

quentin

But whether or not they have horns, it is hard to resist a face full of bread who just wants more!

"More, please?!"

“More, please?!”

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Published in: on March 7, 2016 at 12:46 am  Comments (2)  

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Thank you. A great explanation and photo shoot. Beautiful sheep.

  2. Beatrix has very elegant horns! The nearest equivlanet in British breeds is a Scottish Blackface – but their’s are not nearly so refined. There’s a Diamond in every small-holders flock, isn’t there: it starts with sliced bread, then it’s toast – and just golden brown if you please – and a bit of butter (from sheep milk – both sides!) and certainly know what pockets are for! Personally, I prefer sheep with horns – they’re so much part of individual character! [Jonathan]


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